FEDERAL MINISTRY OF POWER, WORKS & HOUSING

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LATEST PRESS
16 August, 2018

FEC Approves Road Project Linking Anambra and Enugu States

The Federal Executive Council (FEC) on Wednesday approved the sum of N15.7 billion for the completion of a road project that stretches from Enugu State to Anambra State.

The Minister of Power Works and Housing, Babatunde Fashola, disclosed this while briefing newsmen after the FEC meeting presided over by the Acting President, Prof. Yemi Osinbajo, on Wednesday in Abuja.

He said the project included roads captured as Umana-Ndiagu, Agba, Ebenebe, Amansea, Awka, Anambra which spurred into Umumba in Enugu State.

“The contract was awarded in 2012 and there were spurs off the Enugu-Onitsha Highway to six different communities, Ebenebe, Agba, Umana-Ndiagu, Nkpodu, Ekeagu and Ugwuoba.

“Because of lack of appropriate budgeting and funding all of these projects could not be completed.

“There were failures in the implementation as we inherited it; there was also the need to provide for erosion control measures and drains.

“That has led to the revision of the existing contract awarded in 2012 from N10.3 billion to 15.734billion.”

Fashola said that it was the revision to enable the contract to be completed that was presented and approved by the council.

Earlier, Alhaji Lai Mohammed, the Minister of Information and Culture, said that Wednesday’s FEC briefing was one of the shortest as only one minister would brief newsmen on projects that had been approved.(NAN)

Third Mainland Bridge Closure For Maintenance Tests Now Shifted To August 24 * As FG Directs Immediate Deployment Of Trucks To 300-Capacity Trailer Park As Part Of Efforts To Decongest Oshodi-Apapa Expressway The three day closure of the Third Mainland Bridge for Investigative Maintenance Test earlier slated to begin on July 27, 2018, has been shifted to August 24 the Minister of Power, Works and Housing, Mr. Babatunde Fashola SAN, has announced. The Shutdown, earlier scheduled to last from July 27 to July 30 will now last from August 24 to August 26, 2018. In a Press Statement, Fashola said the shift in the date was arrived at after due consultations with the Lagos State Government and wide deliberations with other relevant stakeholders adding that the date shift was done “in order to give succour and relief to the people of Lagos State and other inter-state road users and support the efforts of the State Government." On the efforts to decongest the Oshodi-Apapa Expressway, Fashola said, in the short term, he has directed the immediate deployment of trucks to the trailer park being constructed by the Ministry with the capacity to accommodate about 300 trucks while construction works for the shoreline protection continues. Also, the on-going palliative work on the sections of the Apapa-Oshodi Road , the on-going construction of the road leading to the Apapa Port from Ijora will soon be completed  while the main exit route through Tincan – Oshodi – Oworonshoki is under procurement for award. When completed, the project will enable free flow of traffic in the axis. Also following the visit of the Vice President, Professor Yemi Osinbajo, to Lagos in connection with the Apapa Port Gridlock, the Federal Government has said, as a short term measure, a call up system in the control of truck movement would be introduced adding that it would be initially manual while the long term digital and ICT based system would be developed and deployed. The Association of Truck Owners has agreed to manage the manual system with their members who are truck operators, government also said.
24 July, 2018
My Directives On Improved Service Delivery In The Power    Sector Went To Legal Entities, Not To An Interloper - Fashola Before fiction becomes fact for lack of a response, I feel obliged to respond to SOME, NOT ALL of the allegations credited to one Mr. Sunday Oduntan who presents himself as Executive Director, Research and Advocacy of the Association of Electricity Distributors (ANED), which he made in response to my directives to NERC (the regulator) and BPE/NBET as contracting parties to the DisCos. Throughout my Press Statement which contained the directives, I referred copiously to the provisions of the Electric Power Sector Reform Act (EPSRA) which is the law that regulates the power sector. I referred to DisCos in their capacities as licensees. Mr. Oduntan should tell members of the public if ANED is a licensee. He should tell the public whether he is an investor in a DisCo and in which DisCo he has invested and what he invested. He should tell members of the public that I walked him out of our monthly meeting because he has no capacity to attend and he was not invited. If ANED is not a licensee, who is ANED ? An NGO? If so, they should listen to consumers because Nothing is Going On about poor service. The BPE, NBET and NERC, to whom my directives were made, contracted individually with DisCos not as an association. Any right thinking and well-meaning person knows that power supply has economic consequences and has  political relevance. However to suggest therefore that my directives were political, turns reality on its head; because for the past 20 months, in all my public briefings at monthly meetings with the DisCos, these same issues of service delivery of meters, estimated billings, investment in distribution equipment by DisCos have dominated my remarks. However, assuming this was not so, do the onset of elections preclude the quest for better service or continued Governance? If Mr. Oduntan represents the DisCos who, for reasons best known to them, choose not to act to save their investments, that is a matter of choice for them. I do not recognize him because the law that guides my functions does not recognize him. His statement that no directives from me will save the power sector from collapse, is consistent with the views of someone who has no skin in the game. It is perhaps a Freudian revelation of the mindset of those he represents, whoever they may be. It is a sickening parallel of the Biblical story of the woman who tried to steal a baby before the great King Solomon, and asked them to divide the child. It is revealing of the mindset of a saboteur not a builder, and he would do very well to acquaint himself and advise his co-travellers about the consequences of sabotaging the economy under our Laws. While the DisCos reserve the right to choose to affiliate with that view or disown it, I am optimistic that the power sector will prosper in spite of Oduntan-minded personalities. As for the allegation that figures of power generation and distribution released by me are not true, the taste of the pudding lies with those who eat it. Electricity consumers know what their experience was in 2015, 2016, 2017 and today. These figures have been released many months back when we reached those milestones as part of my monthly report and roadmap of incremental power. It is clearly Oduntan-like, to keep quiet at the time, when there were no directives, and to suddenly wake up many months later to dispute what he did not contest. It is obvious that the warning lights of compliance necessity are blinking, and those he represents do not like the colour. Another Oduntan-minded interpretation of my directive is that it is an attempt to demonize the DisCos. Far from it. If the DisCos connect with their consumers, they will hear from them first-hand, how traumatized they feel about load shedding, absence of meters and estimated billing. The GenCos, who are short paid because the DisCos under-remit in spite of high estimated billing to consumers, will tell DisCos how they feel. My directives seek to rectify these problems because I believe they can be rectified. If Oduntan truly speaks for the DisCos, which I doubt, he should ignore the messenger (Fashola) and advise those for whom he acts as surrogate, to focus on the message. The message is simple: Electricity consumers (which include Fashola), want better service; NBET wants its money; about N800 billion, so she can pay GenCos; If DisCos can prove that FGN owes more than what we admit, they should deduct (N72 billion) from N800 billion and pay the remaining N728 billion which they owe NBET; DisCos should respond to the query from the Ministry of Power, Works and Housing as to why 408 feeders, which have a capacity to deliver 5,756MW of power to consumers only carry 444MW because of faulty lines, bad equipment and load shedding? Oduntan should interprete this and tell the public whether it is the Ministry who should fix these lines and whether the unused energy will not reach the consumers if the feeders are put to use. These are part of the subject of my directives to NERC to address deliberate load shedding. Oduntan should advise his clients to spend the money used in publishing media responses to fix these problems to restore bad lines, and provide transformers and meters to their consumers. That is what electricity consumers want, Better Service. Babatunde Raji Fashola, SAN Honourable Minister of Power, Works and Housing Friday 20th July 2018  
20 July, 2018
Third Mainland Bridge To Be Shut For Three Days For Assessment * Three-day closure begins from July 27 while repairs begin after report of assessment is received to determine extent of deterioration * “We will try to reduce the period of closure as much as possible. But this is ultimately a choice between peoples’ safety”, says Fashola * “There was a signed statement from my office and it did not contain 27 months”, he maintains The Third Mainland Bridge in Lagos will be closed to traffic for three days from July 27, 2018, for investigative work to be conducted to assess the current condition of the Bridge, the Minister of Power, Works and Housing, Mr. Babatunde Fashola SAN, has explained in Abuja. Fashola, who spoke, Monday, as Guest on the Channels Television breakfast programme, Sunrise Daily in the Federal Capital Territory, said the shutdown was necessary in order to ascertain whether there had been any material deterioration between the period the first procurement for maintenance of the Bridge was approved and now adding that the three days would be used “to really do an examination just to be sure that there has been no material deterioration beyond what we procured”. The Minister, who debunked the misreporting in some sections of the media that the Bridge would be closed for 27 months, declared, “The first message we sent out was that it was going to be closed for three days from the 27th of July”, adding that the duration of maintenance would only be determined after the report of the investigative work has been received and extent of deterioration known. He said the investigation would have been carried out earlier but the need to reduce the inconveniences that would accompany the closure compelled government to shift the time to a more convenient period when children would be on vacation and when fewer vehicles were likely to be on the Bridge. “We thought that if we allowed the children to go on vacation first it would reduce the number of vehicles that needed necessarily to be on the road and ultimately reduce the amount of inconvenience. But now we are torn between maintenance and safety and peoples’ convenience”, Fashola said adding, “Essentially the first three days at the end of this month, as issued in our Press Statement, is for investigative work to be conducted to assess the current condition”. The Minister, who said it was only after the assessment of the amount of maintenance work involved that government engineers and the contracting firms would lay out the plan of work, added, “I think it is later in the year or early next year that the repairs will then start”, pointing out that some of the equipment and materials have to be imported. Noting that the repairs would “imminently compel some closure”, Fashola, who recalled that the Bridge had been closed for repairs in the past when he was Governor, pointed out that it was shut down for 12 weeks, adding, “We will try to reduce the period of closure as much as possible. But this is ultimately a choice between peoples’ safety; that bridge must not collapse and it needs maintenance”. “It has been built now going up to a period of 30 years and if you recall, the maintenance that was done at that time was not completed because the budget was cut and that was why they did it in phases. So we are back to what we should have done before. It is costing more but it needs to be done”, he said. Reiterating that he was currently not in the position to say how long the maintenance would last until the receipt of the report from the investigation and the amount of damage determined, declared, “For now, the first three days is what I can speak of and it is when we get the report and determine the extent of damage that we will now come back to the public and tell them and say definitively how long it will be”. “I am not in the position to say it now until that report comes back to us. But what will happen at the end of July is three days”, he said, adding that those peddling the 27 months rumour about the duration of repairs might have mistaken the “July 27th” date mentioned in the government Press Statement for 27 months. “There was a signed statement from my office and it did not contain 27 months”, he said. Fashola, who admonished the Media, both traditional and social, to endeavour to be more accurate in their reportage especially of such sensitive issues, expressed regrets that many of the nation’s public assets have remained unmaintained for decades citing the Ijora Bridge which he recalled collapsed some time ago due to lack of maintenance after 40 years plus.
17 July, 2018
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PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT
20 May, 2018

Multinational: Benin, Cote D’ivoire, Ghana, Nigeria And Togo And The Economic Community Of West African States (ECOWAS)

Study on the Abidjan – Lagos Corridor Highway Development Project

Notice for Expression of Interest

Recruitment Of A Consultant To Conduct A Corridor Economic & Spatial Development Initiative Scoping And Project Packaging Study For The Abidjan-Lagos Highway Corridor Highway Development Program

The ECOWAS Commission has received Grants from the African Development Fund (ADF) and the European Development Fund (through the African Investment Facility –AfIF) to cover the cost of studies on the Abidjan-Lagos Corridor Highway Development Project, and intends to use part of Grant amount to finance service Consultants Contract for Corridor Economic & Spatial Development Initiative (SDI) Scoping and Project Packaging Study for the Abidjan-Lagos Highway Corridor.

The services under this Contract mainly consist of: (i) defining the corridor’s zone of influence to show direct and indirect beneficiaries (populations, other economic activities, etc.) which the corridor affects and vice versa, using the appropriate technical methodology under the SDI concept; (ii) identifying and analyzing the significant developmental aspects of the various zones along the corridor; (iii) identifying a longlist of economic projects (trade, logistics, industry, etc) within the geographical zone of influence of the Corridor, that are worth developing as part of the multinational highway project to result in a holistic economic development corridor, (iii) data gathering, and scoping (shortlisting) of SDI projects; (iv) developing regulatory and institutional framework for the holistic development of the corridor as an economic development corridor; (v) perform economic and financial analysis of selected projects to determine the nature of investments required for further development and (vi) develop an Abidjan-Lagos corridor economic development investment & marketing plan.

Feasibility and Detailed Engineering Studies are to be conducted per the following lots to cover the entire corridor: (i) Lot 1: Abidjan (Cote d’Ivoire)-Takoradi (Ghana), 295.3 km; (ii) Lot 2: Takoradi-Apimanim  (Ghana)-Accra (Ghana)–Akanu/Noepe Border (Ghana), 466 km; and (iii) Lot 3: Akanu (Ghana)-Noepe (Togo)-Lome (Togo)-Agonmey Glozoun (Togo)-Athieme (Benin)-Cotonou (Benin)-Seme-Krake (Benin/Nigeria)-Lagos (Nigeria), 320.06 km.  All distances provided are indicative and could be more depending on the eventual confirmation of alignments by Member States. 

The overall duration of the Feasibility and Detailed Engineering technical studies is estimated at twenty seven (27) months for each lot and the Corridor Economic and Spatial Development Study shall cover the entire corridor for a period of twelve (12) Months with some interim outputs (impacts from shortlisted projects) that could be taken on board by the feasibility and detailed design Consultants.

The ECOWAS Commission invites Consultants (firms with proven experience in spatial development initiatives, economic corridor development, urban and land use planning, transport infrastructure engineering firms for large-scale infrastructure projects) to submit their candidacy for the services described above. Interested, eligible and qualified consultants must produce information on their ability and experience demonstrating that they are qualified for services of similar nature. The shortlisting criteria shall be: (a) general experience in Economic Corridor Development, urban planning and development services (Studies, Technical Assistance, Project Management,) over the last ten (10) years; (b) specific experience in the field of studies of spatial development and establishment of economic zones along multinational highway corridors during the last ten (10) years; (c) Specific experience in cross-border or multinational land-use planning over the past ten (10) years; (d) availability of key personnel (list, qualification, experiences); (e) logistical and equipment; (f) IT Resources and specialized software, etc. (g) capacity to produce reports and all other relevant documents on the study in English and French.

NB: Each reference will be summarized on a project sheet, and will be considered only if the candidate attaches supporting documents indicating the contact information of the contracting authorities so as to facilitate verification of the information provided: Excerpts of contract (inner cover page and page with the signatures) plus Attestation of good performance.

Consultants may form groups to increase their chances of qualification.

The eligibility criteria, the preparation of shortlist, and the selection procedure shall comply with the African Development Bank’s Procurement Framework for operation funded by the Bank Group as of October 2015 available on the Bank’s website: http://www.afdb.org. The selection procedure will be based on Quality Based Selection Method (QBS), and a shortlist of six (6) firms which present the best profiles shall be drawn up after the expression of interest. Also the firms that are part of an international network are to submit one expression of interest.

Interested consultants can obtain further information at the e-mail addresses mentioned below during working hours: 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon (local time) on working days: procurement@ecowas.int with copy to pgueye@ecowas.int; vtulay@ecowas.int; cappiah@ecowas.int ; deklu@ecowas.int ; sbangoura@ecowas.int

Expressions of interest must be delivered in a written form (one (1) signed original plus four (4) copies) in (person, or by registered mail) to the address below, not later than 14th June, 2018 at 11:00 a.m. (GMT+1), Nigerian Time, and must be clearly marked: “Studies on the Abidjan-Lagos Corridor Highway Development Project/Expression of Interest in Consulting Services for Corridor Economic and Spatial Development Initiatives Study”.

For delivery in person or by registered mail to:

Directorate, General Administration, Procurement Division
First (1st) Floor of the ECOWAS Commission Headquarters,
Plot 101, Yakubu Gowon Crescent,
Asokoro District, Abuja,
NIGERIA.

Requests for further information or clarification could be sent by e-mail:
Attention : Commissioner General Administration &Conference
Email : vtulay@ecowas.int

with copies to :

* sbangoura@ecowas.int
* procurement@ecowas.int
* cappiah@ecowas.int
* pgueye@ecowas.int
* deklu@ecowas.int

The working languages shall be English and French. The Expression of Interest will be submitted in English.

OTHER NEWS
15 August, 2018

Remarks By The Permanent Secretary, Federal Ministry Of Power, Works And Housing, (Works And Housing Sector), Mohammed Bukar, At The 24th National Council Meeting On Works, Held In Birnin-Kebbi, Kebbi State

Protocols,

I am pleased to welcome you to the 24th Meeting of the National Council on Works holding in Birnin-Kebbi, Kebbi State.

2. As you are aware, the theme of this year’s National Council Meeting is “Ensuring Value-for-Money in Nigerian Highways Development”. The theme is apt and timely, considering our collective resolve to address the challenges in road development in the country within available resources.

3. In order to ensure that this target is achieved, it has become necessary for all the critical stakeholders to consider and provide contemporary policies that will support the attainment of the above target.

4. It is quite instructive that the theme was carefully chosen to ensure prudent spending of available financial resources in Highways development in the country due to the huge investment governments at all levels are making in road development.

5. The Meeting is significant as it will afford us the desired opportunities to identify challenges in the highways sector and develop strategies towards addressing them.  We are therefore, expected to explore various realistic means of proper utilization of funds and other resources meant for road projects, to enable quick service delivery, which in turn will fast-track national growth and sustainability. May I also stress on the need to ensure that all our recommendations align with the objectives of the Economic Recovery and Growth Plan (ERGP) of 2017-2019 which focuses on restoring economic growth, ease of doing business, investing in our people and creating a competitive economy.  The achievement of these objectives largely lies on the availability of good road network across the country.

6. Distinguished delegates and officials, the timing of this meeting therefore, is very significant as it affords us the opportunity to think through and make necessary provisions in our various Budgets for the year 2019 and beyond as well as take necessary steps that will ensure money spent on roads impacts on the Nigerian economy, positively.

7. On this note, I once again welcome you all and wish you fruitful deliberations.

8. Thank you.

 

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SPEECHES
16 August, 2018

Ensuring Value For Money In Nigerian Highways Development Being Remarks By Babatunde Raji Fashola, San At The National Council On Works, Held In Kebbi

On behalf of the State Commissioners and other Members of Council, I express the appreciation of the Federal Government of Nigeria to the Government and People of Kebbi State for hosting our Council Meeting and for doing so under very hospitable circumstances, in Birnin Kebbi.

Apart from being the home of famous Emirates like Gwandu, Yauri, Zuru, Argungu to mention a few, Kebbi State has come to the centre stage in Nigeria’s developmental history, especially at this time when Governor Atiku Bagudu is providing visionary, developmental and progressive leadership.

Statesmen, not big men, as former Governors, former Chief Judges have rallied around their Governor and Government to pursue a common goal of development.

From Agriculture, to Roads, Housing to Power, whenever it is partnership for Development, Atiku Bagudu will be found making the strongest case for why Kebbi must be involved. This remarkable and inspiring leadership must be acknowledged.

It is in this environment of developmental focus that we converge for the 24th National Council for Works to discuss development around getting “Value for Money in Nigerian Highways”.

Ladies and gentlemen, I found this topic appealing to this Council because of some of the assumptions that have been made about Cost of Roads in Nigeria, the questions I have had to answer, posed by people who ought to know, and because I hope to generate a more informed conversation about the matter.

It is my expectation that in each State, we will be sufficiently interested to interrogate issues like the source of value, where it lies and how to get the best out of it.

Therefore, I would like to start by asking the question why Nigeria has bad roads after almost a decade of prolific receipts from oil boom when oil prices were at $100 per barrel.

The answer is partly because we did not invest our money in Roads in the way that the United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and Brazil, to mention a few oil-exporting countries, have done.

To the extent that Roads are assets that live for longer periods of time and deliver collective National Benefit in terms of movement of goods and services and contribution to the GDP, clearly, it is doubtful that we got optimum value for those oil incomes between 2007 and 2015.

In other words, instead of investing our oil receipts in Roads, and long-term assets, of infrastructure, we spent the money on recurrent items of expenditure.

This is clearly discernible from the Annual Federal Budgets of that era, where the maximum provision for Capital Expenditure struggled to exceed 20%, when they seldom went beyond the threshold of 15%; and what was ultimately released by way of cash was scarcely ever in excess of 50%.

The result of these, of course was that by 2015 when I took office, there were over 200 roads whose contract values were in excess of N2 trillion and for which payments had only cumulated to about N500 billion.

Some of these roads had been awarded for upwards of 10 (ten) years. Inadequate budget and funding had delayed their completion. Many sites had been abandoned, workers laid off, equipment grounded.

This was where the Buhari Government picked up. With significantly lower oil incomes, we got the contractors back to site one after the other. We raised the budget size from N4 Trillion to N6 Trillion in 2016 and increased capital spending to 30%; which was funded by borrowing to finance the deficit.

For those who wanted roads to be fixed and those who did not want the nation to borrow, there is no middle ground. You either borrow to invest in tomorrow’s infrastructure at today’s prices, or wait until you can do it tomorrow at tomorrow’s price.

Our reality today is that the roads that were awarded 10 years ago and were not funded then have to be funded at today’s prices of money, interest rates, and at today’s prices of cement, iron rod, laterite and labour wages.

Clearly, we lost not only the value of money not properly invested, we lost value in the cost of doing business without good roads. We lost value in productivity by men and machine that became redundant.

While we cannot recover what is lost, we must not lose what is ahead; in this regard, I am happy to say that the Buhari Government is investing wisely and sensibly in the infrastructure that will drive Nigeria’s tomorrow.

From Rail to Ports, Power and Roads, this administration is resolute in its determination to complete ongoing or abandoned projects. Today, there is no State in Nigeria where the Federal Government of Nigeria is not executing one Road Project.

Hon. Commissioner has confirmed in his address Roads being executed in Kebbi. He wants more , the Buhari Government is ready to do more. It is in your hands to bring him back.

Undoubtedly, we have done more with less. This is the meaning of value. But there are other challenges that we must work together to improve upon in order to remove avoidable costs from Road and related infrastructure development.

A) Land issues, compensation, and court cases compound the cost of construction.

B) Conflicts, security breaches, pose risks to construction workers, which escalates costs in many ways, such as insurance, payment of security personnel, delays to project completion, to mention a few;

C) The absence of uniform Public Sector Procurement Prices;

D) Proper project planning, development and supervision;

E) Post-construction maintenance of scheduled and unscheduled natures to achieve asset life cycle expectation and performance; ( Bridges – Tamburawa, Tatabu, Third Mainland, Niger Bridge, Koton Karfe , Ijora, Isaac Boro).

F) Dispute resolution mechanisms as a means of achieving cost efficiency in road construction and achieving value for money, must be interrogated;

G) Government Treasury Operations and Payment Systems, review and reform will contribute to achieving better value for money in Road Development Project.

H) Increasing local content in Nigeria Road Construction and implementing Presidential Order 5.

Ladies and Gentlemen, these are only some of the items of avoidable costs around which we should have a conversation and a resolution if we are to achieve better value for money.

Each one of them is a full subject of debate in itself.

It is my expectation that many sections of the construction industry will rise up to the challenges inherent in improving each of the areas I have highlighted.

I make myself ready to contribute and participate upon reasonable notice.

Thank you for listening and I wish us very fruitful deliberations.

Babatunde Raji Fashola, SAN
Honourable Minister of Power, Works, and Housing

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Photo News
15 August, 2018

MEMBERS OF THE HIGH TABLE AND OTHER DELEGATES AT THE PERMANENT SECRETARYS MEETING DURING THE 24TH NATIONAL COUNCIL ON WORKS

Members Of The High Table And Other Delegates At The Permanent Secretarys Meeting During The 24th National Council On Works With Theme Ensuring ValueForMoney In Nigerian Highways Development Taking Place In Birnin Kebbi Kebbi State

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Power News
Photo News
16 August, 2018

24TH MEETING OF THE NATIONAL COUNCIL ON WORKS TAKING PLACE IN KEBBI STATE

The Honourable Minister of Power Works and Housing His Excellency Babatunde Raji Fashola SAN The Executive Governor of Kebbi State Senator Abubakar Atiku Bagudu The Hon Minister of State II Ministry of Power Works and Housing Hon Mustapha Baba Shehuri the Permanent Secretary Ministry of Power Works and Housing and other Dignitaries and Royal Highness at the 24th Meeting of the National Council on Works taking place in Kebbi State

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National Council On Works (Nacow)