FEDERAL MINISTRY OF POWER, WORKS & HOUSING

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14 August, 2018

Electricity: Customer Eligibility Policy Yields Result – Fashola

The Customer Eligibility Policy of the Federal Government has started yielding result, with five industrial customers presently buying electricity directly from Generation Companies (GenCos).

The Minister of Power, Works and Housing, Babatunde Fashola made this known on Monday at the 29th stakeholders’ meeting organised by Mainstream Energy Solutions Ltd., in Minna.

The News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) reports that the Customer Eligibility Policy was declared by the minister in 2017 to improve distribution side of electricity and facilitate better power supply to consumers who consumed up to two mws and above.

“From reports reaching me, five industrial customers are now benefitting from the policy and taking their power directly from a GENCO, which incidentally is our host today, messers Mainstream Energy Ltd.

“We also have a list of 26 industrial customers who are seeking to benefit from the policy,’’ Fashola said.

According him , directives have been issued to the Nigeria Electricity Regulatory Commission (NERC) to work out and implement competition transition charges as provided by Law, to safeguard operators from any losses arising from the policy.

“We will continue to monitor the impact of the policy and remain flexible to keep what works and change what does not.

“I urge everybody to remain open-minded, adaptive and responsive.’’

He said the provision of N701 billion payment assurance guaranteed by government was to give comfort to investors in the generation side of the value chain.

This, he said was designed to ensure the payment of power produced by GenCos.

“Since its implementation in 2017, recovery of payments by GenCos has increased from 20 per cent to 80 per cent and power supply capacity has improved from 4,000mw to 7,000mw and there is an appetite by other players to participate.

“Is it perfect, certainly not, do the GenCos like it, I am sure that they will tell that 80 per cent recovery is better for business than 20 per cent recovery, but they would rather have 100 per cent recovery,’’ he said.

The minster, however, said that GenCos must transparently invoice for their output made on generation of power.
“We must harmonise the price of gas for payment under the scheme, where there are differential prices arising from different gas suppliers.

“Therefore, we must work as owners of the policy to nurture and improve on its capabilities.

On Meter Asset Provider (MAP), he said the policy was introduced to address the meter supply gap, relieve the DISCOs of the financial burden of meters.

He said reports reaching him indicated that there was an embracement of the policy, adding that entrepreneurs were showing interest and talking to banks to raise finance.

On energising educational institutions and markets, Fashola said, “these are government-led initiatives based on the rural electrification plan approved by the President in 2016 to provide access to power for rural dwellers and vulnerable members of our society.’’

He said government had proposed to use six small hydro dams that had been abandoned for decades to energise Federal Government owned universities and some markets.

“There are currently 15 markets under contemplation with Ariaria, Sabon Gari and Sura markets in Aba, Kano and Lagos as flagships.

“The six hydro dams are to be concessioned to private operators on Build, Operate, and Transfer (BOT),’’ he said.

Source: NAN

My Directives On Improved Service Delivery In The Power    Sector Went To Legal Entities, Not To An Interloper - Fashola Before fiction becomes fact for lack of a response, I feel obliged to respond to SOME, NOT ALL of the allegations credited to one Mr. Sunday Oduntan who presents himself as Executive Director, Research and Advocacy of the Association of Electricity Distributors (ANED), which he made in response to my directives to NERC (the regulator) and BPE/NBET as contracting parties to the DisCos. Throughout my Press Statement which contained the directives, I referred copiously to the provisions of the Electric Power Sector Reform Act (EPSRA) which is the law that regulates the power sector. I referred to DisCos in their capacities as licensees. Mr. Oduntan should tell members of the public if ANED is a licensee. He should tell the public whether he is an investor in a DisCo and in which DisCo he has invested and what he invested. He should tell members of the public that I walked him out of our monthly meeting because he has no capacity to attend and he was not invited. If ANED is not a licensee, who is ANED ? An NGO? If so, they should listen to consumers because Nothing is Going On about poor service. The BPE, NBET and NERC, to whom my directives were made, contracted individually with DisCos not as an association. Any right thinking and well-meaning person knows that power supply has economic consequences and has  political relevance. However to suggest therefore that my directives were political, turns reality on its head; because for the past 20 months, in all my public briefings at monthly meetings with the DisCos, these same issues of service delivery of meters, estimated billings, investment in distribution equipment by DisCos have dominated my remarks. However, assuming this was not so, do the onset of elections preclude the quest for better service or continued Governance? If Mr. Oduntan represents the DisCos who, for reasons best known to them, choose not to act to save their investments, that is a matter of choice for them. I do not recognize him because the law that guides my functions does not recognize him. His statement that no directives from me will save the power sector from collapse, is consistent with the views of someone who has no skin in the game. It is perhaps a Freudian revelation of the mindset of those he represents, whoever they may be. It is a sickening parallel of the Biblical story of the woman who tried to steal a baby before the great King Solomon, and asked them to divide the child. It is revealing of the mindset of a saboteur not a builder, and he would do very well to acquaint himself and advise his co-travellers about the consequences of sabotaging the economy under our Laws. While the DisCos reserve the right to choose to affiliate with that view or disown it, I am optimistic that the power sector will prosper in spite of Oduntan-minded personalities. As for the allegation that figures of power generation and distribution released by me are not true, the taste of the pudding lies with those who eat it. Electricity consumers know what their experience was in 2015, 2016, 2017 and today. These figures have been released many months back when we reached those milestones as part of my monthly report and roadmap of incremental power. It is clearly Oduntan-like, to keep quiet at the time, when there were no directives, and to suddenly wake up many months later to dispute what he did not contest. It is obvious that the warning lights of compliance necessity are blinking, and those he represents do not like the colour. Another Oduntan-minded interpretation of my directive is that it is an attempt to demonize the DisCos. Far from it. If the DisCos connect with their consumers, they will hear from them first-hand, how traumatized they feel about load shedding, absence of meters and estimated billing. The GenCos, who are short paid because the DisCos under-remit in spite of high estimated billing to consumers, will tell DisCos how they feel. My directives seek to rectify these problems because I believe they can be rectified. If Oduntan truly speaks for the DisCos, which I doubt, he should ignore the messenger (Fashola) and advise those for whom he acts as surrogate, to focus on the message. The message is simple: Electricity consumers (which include Fashola), want better service; NBET wants its money; about N800 billion, so she can pay GenCos; If DisCos can prove that FGN owes more than what we admit, they should deduct (N72 billion) from N800 billion and pay the remaining N728 billion which they owe NBET; DisCos should respond to the query from the Ministry of Power, Works and Housing as to why 408 feeders, which have a capacity to deliver 5,756MW of power to consumers only carry 444MW because of faulty lines, bad equipment and load shedding? Oduntan should interprete this and tell the public whether it is the Ministry who should fix these lines and whether the unused energy will not reach the consumers if the feeders are put to use. These are part of the subject of my directives to NERC to address deliberate load shedding. Oduntan should advise his clients to spend the money used in publishing media responses to fix these problems to restore bad lines, and provide transformers and meters to their consumers. That is what electricity consumers want, Better Service. Babatunde Raji Fashola, SAN Honourable Minister of Power, Works and Housing Friday 20th July 2018  
20 July, 2018
Third Mainland Bridge To Be Shut For Three Days For Assessment * Three-day closure begins from July 27 while repairs begin after report of assessment is received to determine extent of deterioration * “We will try to reduce the period of closure as much as possible. But this is ultimately a choice between peoples’ safety”, says Fashola * “There was a signed statement from my office and it did not contain 27 months”, he maintains The Third Mainland Bridge in Lagos will be closed to traffic for three days from July 27, 2018, for investigative work to be conducted to assess the current condition of the Bridge, the Minister of Power, Works and Housing, Mr. Babatunde Fashola SAN, has explained in Abuja. Fashola, who spoke, Monday, as Guest on the Channels Television breakfast programme, Sunrise Daily in the Federal Capital Territory, said the shutdown was necessary in order to ascertain whether there had been any material deterioration between the period the first procurement for maintenance of the Bridge was approved and now adding that the three days would be used “to really do an examination just to be sure that there has been no material deterioration beyond what we procured”. The Minister, who debunked the misreporting in some sections of the media that the Bridge would be closed for 27 months, declared, “The first message we sent out was that it was going to be closed for three days from the 27th of July”, adding that the duration of maintenance would only be determined after the report of the investigative work has been received and extent of deterioration known. He said the investigation would have been carried out earlier but the need to reduce the inconveniences that would accompany the closure compelled government to shift the time to a more convenient period when children would be on vacation and when fewer vehicles were likely to be on the Bridge. “We thought that if we allowed the children to go on vacation first it would reduce the number of vehicles that needed necessarily to be on the road and ultimately reduce the amount of inconvenience. But now we are torn between maintenance and safety and peoples’ convenience”, Fashola said adding, “Essentially the first three days at the end of this month, as issued in our Press Statement, is for investigative work to be conducted to assess the current condition”. The Minister, who said it was only after the assessment of the amount of maintenance work involved that government engineers and the contracting firms would lay out the plan of work, added, “I think it is later in the year or early next year that the repairs will then start”, pointing out that some of the equipment and materials have to be imported. Noting that the repairs would “imminently compel some closure”, Fashola, who recalled that the Bridge had been closed for repairs in the past when he was Governor, pointed out that it was shut down for 12 weeks, adding, “We will try to reduce the period of closure as much as possible. But this is ultimately a choice between peoples’ safety; that bridge must not collapse and it needs maintenance”. “It has been built now going up to a period of 30 years and if you recall, the maintenance that was done at that time was not completed because the budget was cut and that was why they did it in phases. So we are back to what we should have done before. It is costing more but it needs to be done”, he said. Reiterating that he was currently not in the position to say how long the maintenance would last until the receipt of the report from the investigation and the amount of damage determined, declared, “For now, the first three days is what I can speak of and it is when we get the report and determine the extent of damage that we will now come back to the public and tell them and say definitively how long it will be”. “I am not in the position to say it now until that report comes back to us. But what will happen at the end of July is three days”, he said, adding that those peddling the 27 months rumour about the duration of repairs might have mistaken the “July 27th” date mentioned in the government Press Statement for 27 months. “There was a signed statement from my office and it did not contain 27 months”, he said. Fashola, who admonished the Media, both traditional and social, to endeavour to be more accurate in their reportage especially of such sensitive issues, expressed regrets that many of the nation’s public assets have remained unmaintained for decades citing the Ijora Bridge which he recalled collapsed some time ago due to lack of maintenance after 40 years plus.
17 July, 2018
Housing Is A Catalyst For Development And Sustainable Economic Growth Says Fashola The Minister of Power, Works and Housing, Babatunde Raji Fashola, SAN, has said that the present Administration has taken leadership role by demonstrating how provision of affordable housing can catalyze development and sustainable economic growth in Nigeria. Fashola explained that President Buhari has used the National Housing Programme (NHP), presently active in 34 States of the federation in the last three years, as one of the tools to grow the economy and extricate the nation from recession.   According to him, ‘’we are able to employ, on the average, a thousand people at each of the 34 NHP sites, and this is only for the pilot stage’’. The Minister stated this at the recently concluded 7th Meeting of the National Council on Lands, Housing and Urban Development held at the Banquet Hall, Gombe International Hotel, Gombe State with the theme ‘Provision of Affordable Housing: A Catalyst for Development and Sustainable Economic Growth’. Speaking at the Council, Fashola urged Policy Makers and government at all levels to make efforts in consolidating on the achievements of the present government by building more houses and also proffer policies to address urbanization. He said that one of such policies is to consciously redistribute wealth and opportunities by strong commitments to programs like Agriculture and Mining. The Minister stated that from his trips across the nation, ‘’I can tell you categorically that President Buhari’s investment in infrastructural development is impacting on the nations urbanization challenge in a positive way’’. In his remarks, the Special Guest of Honour and the Host Governor, the Executive Governor of Gombe State, H.E. Alhaji Ibrahim Hassan Dankwambo, commended the Ministry for choosing Gombe State as host, assuring that the Council meeting was bound to address the challenges facing Land Administration, Housing and Urban Development to enable the sector contribute meaningfully to the socio-economic development of the nation. Dankwambo stated that access to quality and affordable housing is not only fundamental to the health and well being of families and communities, but critical to human survival. He urged Government at all levels to work assiduously in ensuring provision of affordable housing, particularly for the low and modest income earners in the country. While he commended the efforts of the Federal Government in the construction of mass housing under the National Housing Programme (NHP), stating  that the state government has also consolidated on these gains with the construction of over  1, 000 housing units, fully completed and allocated to civil servants and the general public in the state. Earlier, while addressing the meeting of the Permanent Secretaries at the state level and other stakeholders, the Permanent Secretary of the Ministry, (Works & Housing) Mohammed Bukar, said that the provision of affordable housing rest on the shoulders of all stakeholders in the industry, adding that ‘it is a collective duty to provide leadership for achieving the set objective’. Bukar enjoined all stakeholders to make judicious use of the opportunity provided by the 7th Meeting of the National Council on Lands, Housing and Urban Development to deliberate on the memoranda submitted for consideration towards formulating and strengthening policies that will address the challenges in the built environment and making housing affordable to all Nigerians. In her goodwill message, the Head of the Civil Service of the Federation, Mrs Winfred Oyo-Ita, represented by the Permanent Secretary, Service Welfare, Mrs Didi Walson Jack, stated that the Council meeting is an auspicious moment bringing together key stakeholders in the housing sector to deliberate on policy issues geared towards the full delivery of mass housing. She commended the ministry for initiating and promoting the discuss on affordable housing in Nigeria According to her, the Federal Executive Council in consideration of the need to reposition the civil service for greater productivity approved the Federal Civil Service Strategy and Implementation Plan, adding that one of the 8 goals of the Plan is to enhance the value reposition of Civil Servants via improving their access to affordable housing. She stressed that this initiative led to the creation of the Federal Integrated Staff Housing (FISH) programme by the Head of Service, which has assisted over       35, 000 civil servants to acquire homes through the provision of mortgage with a long term repayment plan. The Council meeting ended with the issuance of a Communiqué unanimously agreed by all stakeholders to chat the way forward and also formulate a holistic Housing Policy for development and sustainable economic growth in Nigeria. A total number of Thirty-four (34) memoranda were received and considered under the following four thematic groups: i.                     Policy, Finance, Capacity Building for Affordable Housing Delivery; ii.                   Building Consideration and Institutional Strengthening for Affordable Housing Provision; iii.                  Urban Planning Provision for Affordable Housing; and iv.                 Lands and Infrastructure Consideration for Affordable Housing.
16 July, 2018
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PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT
20 May, 2018

Multinational: Benin, Cote D’ivoire, Ghana, Nigeria And Togo And The Economic Community Of West African States (ECOWAS)

Study on the Abidjan – Lagos Corridor Highway Development Project

Notice for Expression of Interest

Recruitment Of A Consultant To Conduct A Corridor Economic & Spatial Development Initiative Scoping And Project Packaging Study For The Abidjan-Lagos Highway Corridor Highway Development Program

The ECOWAS Commission has received Grants from the African Development Fund (ADF) and the European Development Fund (through the African Investment Facility –AfIF) to cover the cost of studies on the Abidjan-Lagos Corridor Highway Development Project, and intends to use part of Grant amount to finance service Consultants Contract for Corridor Economic & Spatial Development Initiative (SDI) Scoping and Project Packaging Study for the Abidjan-Lagos Highway Corridor.

The services under this Contract mainly consist of: (i) defining the corridor’s zone of influence to show direct and indirect beneficiaries (populations, other economic activities, etc.) which the corridor affects and vice versa, using the appropriate technical methodology under the SDI concept; (ii) identifying and analyzing the significant developmental aspects of the various zones along the corridor; (iii) identifying a longlist of economic projects (trade, logistics, industry, etc) within the geographical zone of influence of the Corridor, that are worth developing as part of the multinational highway project to result in a holistic economic development corridor, (iii) data gathering, and scoping (shortlisting) of SDI projects; (iv) developing regulatory and institutional framework for the holistic development of the corridor as an economic development corridor; (v) perform economic and financial analysis of selected projects to determine the nature of investments required for further development and (vi) develop an Abidjan-Lagos corridor economic development investment & marketing plan.

Feasibility and Detailed Engineering Studies are to be conducted per the following lots to cover the entire corridor: (i) Lot 1: Abidjan (Cote d’Ivoire)-Takoradi (Ghana), 295.3 km; (ii) Lot 2: Takoradi-Apimanim  (Ghana)-Accra (Ghana)–Akanu/Noepe Border (Ghana), 466 km; and (iii) Lot 3: Akanu (Ghana)-Noepe (Togo)-Lome (Togo)-Agonmey Glozoun (Togo)-Athieme (Benin)-Cotonou (Benin)-Seme-Krake (Benin/Nigeria)-Lagos (Nigeria), 320.06 km.  All distances provided are indicative and could be more depending on the eventual confirmation of alignments by Member States. 

The overall duration of the Feasibility and Detailed Engineering technical studies is estimated at twenty seven (27) months for each lot and the Corridor Economic and Spatial Development Study shall cover the entire corridor for a period of twelve (12) Months with some interim outputs (impacts from shortlisted projects) that could be taken on board by the feasibility and detailed design Consultants.

The ECOWAS Commission invites Consultants (firms with proven experience in spatial development initiatives, economic corridor development, urban and land use planning, transport infrastructure engineering firms for large-scale infrastructure projects) to submit their candidacy for the services described above. Interested, eligible and qualified consultants must produce information on their ability and experience demonstrating that they are qualified for services of similar nature. The shortlisting criteria shall be: (a) general experience in Economic Corridor Development, urban planning and development services (Studies, Technical Assistance, Project Management,) over the last ten (10) years; (b) specific experience in the field of studies of spatial development and establishment of economic zones along multinational highway corridors during the last ten (10) years; (c) Specific experience in cross-border or multinational land-use planning over the past ten (10) years; (d) availability of key personnel (list, qualification, experiences); (e) logistical and equipment; (f) IT Resources and specialized software, etc. (g) capacity to produce reports and all other relevant documents on the study in English and French.

NB: Each reference will be summarized on a project sheet, and will be considered only if the candidate attaches supporting documents indicating the contact information of the contracting authorities so as to facilitate verification of the information provided: Excerpts of contract (inner cover page and page with the signatures) plus Attestation of good performance.

Consultants may form groups to increase their chances of qualification.

The eligibility criteria, the preparation of shortlist, and the selection procedure shall comply with the African Development Bank’s Procurement Framework for operation funded by the Bank Group as of October 2015 available on the Bank’s website: http://www.afdb.org. The selection procedure will be based on Quality Based Selection Method (QBS), and a shortlist of six (6) firms which present the best profiles shall be drawn up after the expression of interest. Also the firms that are part of an international network are to submit one expression of interest.

Interested consultants can obtain further information at the e-mail addresses mentioned below during working hours: 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon (local time) on working days: procurement@ecowas.int with copy to pgueye@ecowas.int; vtulay@ecowas.int; cappiah@ecowas.int ; deklu@ecowas.int ; sbangoura@ecowas.int

Expressions of interest must be delivered in a written form (one (1) signed original plus four (4) copies) in (person, or by registered mail) to the address below, not later than 14th June, 2018 at 11:00 a.m. (GMT+1), Nigerian Time, and must be clearly marked: “Studies on the Abidjan-Lagos Corridor Highway Development Project/Expression of Interest in Consulting Services for Corridor Economic and Spatial Development Initiatives Study”.

For delivery in person or by registered mail to:

Directorate, General Administration, Procurement Division
First (1st) Floor of the ECOWAS Commission Headquarters,
Plot 101, Yakubu Gowon Crescent,
Asokoro District, Abuja,
NIGERIA.

Requests for further information or clarification could be sent by e-mail:
Attention : Commissioner General Administration &Conference
Email : vtulay@ecowas.int

with copies to :

* sbangoura@ecowas.int
* procurement@ecowas.int
* cappiah@ecowas.int
* pgueye@ecowas.int
* deklu@ecowas.int

The working languages shall be English and French. The Expression of Interest will be submitted in English.

OTHER NEWS
15 August, 2018

Remarks By The Permanent Secretary, Federal Ministry Of Power, Works And Housing, (Works And Housing Sector), Mohammed Bukar, At The 24th National Council Meeting On Works, Held In Birnin-Kebbi, Kebbi State

Protocols,

I am pleased to welcome you to the 24th Meeting of the National Council on Works holding in Birnin-Kebbi, Kebbi State.

2. As you are aware, the theme of this year’s National Council Meeting is “Ensuring Value-for-Money in Nigerian Highways Development”. The theme is apt and timely, considering our collective resolve to address the challenges in road development in the country within available resources.

3. In order to ensure that this target is achieved, it has become necessary for all the critical stakeholders to consider and provide contemporary policies that will support the attainment of the above target.

4. It is quite instructive that the theme was carefully chosen to ensure prudent spending of available financial resources in Highways development in the country due to the huge investment governments at all levels are making in road development.

5. The Meeting is significant as it will afford us the desired opportunities to identify challenges in the highways sector and develop strategies towards addressing them.  We are therefore, expected to explore various realistic means of proper utilization of funds and other resources meant for road projects, to enable quick service delivery, which in turn will fast-track national growth and sustainability. May I also stress on the need to ensure that all our recommendations align with the objectives of the Economic Recovery and Growth Plan (ERGP) of 2017-2019 which focuses on restoring economic growth, ease of doing business, investing in our people and creating a competitive economy.  The achievement of these objectives largely lies on the availability of good road network across the country.

6. Distinguished delegates and officials, the timing of this meeting therefore, is very significant as it affords us the opportunity to think through and make necessary provisions in our various Budgets for the year 2019 and beyond as well as take necessary steps that will ensure money spent on roads impacts on the Nigerian economy, positively.

7. On this note, I once again welcome you all and wish you fruitful deliberations.

8. Thank you.

 

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SPEECHES
13 August, 2018

Remarks Of The Honourable Minister Of Power, Works And Housing At The 29th Monthly Power Sector Meeting Hosted By Mainstream Energy (Concessionaires Of Kainji And Jebba Hydro-Power Stations) In Niger

In lieu of our monthly meeting for July 2018, I opted to brief the public about our progress so far in our journey to incremental power towards steady and, finally, uninterrupted supply.

In the process, I highlighted the challenges we have overcome and those we are dealing with, and what needs to be done and who has the responsibility to do so.

Those who know and who genuinely desire to solve problems in this industry do not need to be told that the most pressing challenge of the Sector today lies at the Distribution end.

Amongst the challenges at this sector of the value chain, (and there are problems in Gas, Generation and Transmission), the most urgent are Distribution of available energy to consumers, and there is an unused energy in the region of 2,000 Megawatts in this category.

The other, of course, is the supply of meters to consumers. These two issues of power distribution and supply of meters rank highest in the feedback from the stakeholders in the industry.

In order to address these challenges and find solutions to them, I issued policy guidelines and directives to appropriate institutions for them to act.

It is in this context that I think it is fortuitous that Mainstream is our host today, because my remarks will focus on the review of progress we have made with some of our policies.

I have always insisted that there must be methods to decision making, and this includes evaluation of decisions to see how they have progressed and what needs to be added or modified.

Therefore, we must understand that policies are not an end in themselves . Policies represent an expression of our hopes and aspirations and must be embraced, nursed and nurtured to deliver on all their capacities and possibilities.

In a sense, I liken policies to the human being. At birth, he represents the hopes of parents for tomorrow. Left alone, that infant is helpless, so he is dependent for feeding, clothing and all survival needs until he becomes ambulatory, able to stand, walk, talk, run, and matures into adulthood.

With this analogy in the background, I will address the progress of some of our policies for the benefit of members and the larger public.

A) N701 Billion Payment Assurance Guarantee

This was not in any law. It was a creation of the Buhari Government to give comfort to investors in the Generation side of the value chain that they will be paid for supplying power.

Since its implementation in 2017, recovery of payments by GENCOs has increased from 20% to 80%; and power supply capacity has improved from 4,000MW to 7,000MW and there is an appetite by other players to participate.

Is it perfect? Certainly not.

Do the GENCOs like it? I am sure that they will tell that 80% recovery is better for business than 20% recovery, but they would rather have 100% recovery.

But this is only one side of the coin. The other side of the coin is that GENCOs must transparently invoice for their output and, for example, we must harmonise the price of gas for payment under the scheme, where there are differential prices arising from different Gas suppliers.

Therefore, we must work as the parents and owners of the policy to nurture and improve on its capabilities.

B) Eligible Customer

This was introduced on 15th of May 2017, and the Regulations to govern it were issued by NERC on 1st of November 2017.

The purpose was, amongst others, to improve distribution side of electricity and facilitate better power supply to consumers who consumed up to 2MW and above.

From reports reaching me, 5 (FIVE) industrial customers are now benefitting from the policy and taking their power directly from a GENCO, who incidentally is our host today, Messrs Mainstream Energy Ltd.

We also have a list of 26 (TWENTY-SIX) industrial customers who are seeking to benefit from the policy.

The DISCOs must be interested to know that I have also issued directives to NERC to work out and implement Competition Transition Charges as provided by Law, to safeguard them from any losses.

We will continue to monitor the impact of the policy and remain flexible to keep what works and change what does not; and I urge everybody to remain open-minded, adaptive and responsive.

C) Meter Asset Provider (MAP)

This policy was introduced to address the meter supply gap, relieve the DISCOs of the financial burden of meters, allow entrepreneurs to take up this as a business and diversify the sources of meter supply.

The Regulations and Condition for its operation were issued by NERC on 8th March 2018.

Reports reaching me indicate that there is an embracement of the policy. Entrepreneurs are showing interest and talking to banks to raise finance.

Some DISCOs have signed up to the Government-Supported fund of N37 Billion and we will keep an eye on the progress of the initiative.

Government intervention in this regard is part of its role of enabling to be effective. It does not relieve the DISCOs of their contractual obligation to provide meters.

On the contrary it seeks to help them perform their contract.

D) Energising Educational Institutions and Markets

These are Government-led initiatives based on the Rural Electrification plan approved by the President in 2016 to provide access to power for rural dwellers and vulnerable members of our society.

We proposed to use 6 (SIX) small hydro dams that had been abandoned for decades, Federal Government owned universities and some markets as anchors.

Apart from the Universities, where Government is directly funding the intervention, the markets are being privately funded, contrary to the untrue allegations that have been made in the media, and I challenge those who made the allegation to provide proof to the contrary.

There are currently 15 (FIFTEEN) markets under contemplation with Ariaria, Sabon Gari and Sura markets in Aba, Kano and Lagos as flagships.

The 6 (SIX) hydro dams are to be concessioned to private operators to build, operate, and transfer.

Our thinking is simple. While the whole value chain and power privatization gradually evolves, it is possible to create Oases of success by showing to our children that they can have reliable power while in school.

If that is a reason to get children to school and keep them there, certainly, no good business can oppose this.

Indeed, it seems to me sensible to expect that the future of today’s business and even Government, rests solely on the quality of education that the current generation of students get.

As for the markets, the 37,000 shops in Ariaria, about 13,000 in Sabon Gari, and about 1,000 in Sura represent SMEs, where the majority of our people earn a living.

They are currently paying for expensive power from small and environmentally unfriendly generators.

It seems to me that our nation will have come to their aid if we deliver reliable power to the most vulnerable like them.

Ladies and Gentlemen, this is my update about the progress of our policies and the rationale behind them.

I welcome you to this meeting and wish us fruitful deliberations.

Babatunde Raji Fashola, SAN
Honourable Minister of Power, Works and Housing

Monday 13th August 2018

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Photo News
15 August, 2018

MEMBERS OF THE HIGH TABLE AND OTHER DELEGATES AT THE PERMANENT SECRETARYS MEETING DURING THE 24TH NATIONAL COUNCIL ON WORKS

Members Of The High Table And Other Delegates At The Permanent Secretarys Meeting During The 24th National Council On Works With Theme Ensuring ValueForMoney In Nigerian Highways Development Taking Place In Birnin Kebbi Kebbi State

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Power News
Photo News
14 August, 2018

FASHOLAHASSAN AT THE 29TH MONTHLY POWER SECTOR OPERATORS MEETING IN MINNA NIGER STATE

Hon Minister of Power Works Housing Mr Babatunde FasholaSAN middleMinister of State Surv Suleiman Zarma Hassanright and Permanent Secretary Power Engr Louis Edozien left during the 29th Monthly Power Sector Operators Meeting hosted by Mainstream Energy Solutions Limited operators of Kainji and Jebba Hydro Power Plants on Monday13th August 2018 at the Justice Legbo Kutigi Hall Minna Niger State

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National Council On Works (Nacow)